Writing for Therapy/Wellbeing

Creative writing for therapy is essentially a technique that can help to unravel and explore your thoughts, feelings and experiences. You don’t have to be a writer to benefit from this. Just a pen and paper.

Many people have kept journals for years to capture their thoughts and indeed journaling is one tool in the writing therapy toolkit. However, there are so many different tools, techniques and prompts that can help people discover more about themselves, help explore difficult issues, think about where they are in life, what is good and what is still hard to talk about. Writing for therapy is so much more than just keeping a journal. Song lyrics, lists and poems just touch the surface of different writing prompts.

The beauty of therapeutic writing is that there are no ‘grammar’ rules. It’s not about grammar, form or style. It doesn’t have to rhyme, words don’t have to be spelt correctly, make sense or ever be seen by anyone else. It’s about writing from the heart and what makes sense for you. It’s writing without thinking – or at least that’s what it can feel like.

Benefits can include

  • Gaining personal insight and understanding in a creative way – discovering more about how we feel, think, our hopes, dreams and experiences.
  • Exploring different perspectives about your life – perhaps finding a different way of looking at things.

Our Writing Groups

Carol and Jane have both had specific training to lead writing for therapy groups. We have learnt a lot about ourselves through our own therapy writing. We are passionate about bringing therapeutic creative writing/writing for wellbeing to different audiences and to share the vast array of writing techniques and prompts that help promote the pen to flow.

Join a writing group

Coming in Autumn 2022

Monthly Online Writing Groups

We are offering monthly online (via Zoom) writing for therapy/wellbeing groups.

You may already be someone who benefits from reflective writing, or this may be very new for you. Perhaps you would just like to know more. These groups are designed to be engaging and safe with no pressure to share any of your writing. We will share different prompts, exercises and techniques to help you explore different issues and experiences important to you.
Also be assured you do not have to have any issues to join our groups! These are open to anyone who has an interest in developing different ways of writing as a way of expressing and exploring themselves.

One off Online Workshops

We will be running regular one off workshops (via Zoom) designed to explore different creative writing for therapy techniques.

Register interest

If you are interested in our workshops or groups then please either:

– register interest with us and we will keep you updated with dates and costs.
Or
– keep an eye on our Facebook and Instagram pages where we will post all updates.

Local Area (Dorset/Bournemouth)

We are looking at the possibility of in person groups – TBC

Our writing journey!

Carol

Like many people I kept a diary as a teenager and over the years have returned to ad hoc journal writing. I was ok at English at school, but didn’t much care for poetry, Shakespeare or most of the stuff we had to read. I certainly have never thought of myself as a writer, writing mainly for work rather than pleasure. Finding out more about creative writing for therapy has really opened my eyes to how writing can help to express and gain insight into my own often rambling mind. My pet hate has always been poetry – it felt too ‘clever’ and I rarely found a poem that I understood. However, I have amazed myself at the different uses of poetry in therapy writing, it doesn’t have to be clever or make sense to anyone apart from me. It has tapped into a different part of my brain and some of the short form poetry I have found to really help focus my mind. But be assured I’m not all about poetry – I love song lyrics, writing lists and many other quirky writing styles and prompts.

Jane

I too was someone who wrote a journal from an early age, but school added a layer to writing that seemingly prevented me from developing a creative practice. I now write for pleasure with no audience in mind.

My own therapy, and extensive training has allowed me to understand myself better and build a growing sense of awareness. However, writing seems to offer a different perspective. From fingers to page, a feeling of Free Writing; whatever comes. I have learned more about my internal world and narrative through writing than I could have imagined.

At times it has been hard. My defences can go up and I might hear myself mitigating or judging my words. With curiosity I come to realise that there are times when I don’t want to hear some of the truths that emerge. All I need is to be aware of those parts of me that I don’t much like; nothing else. That’s how I keep myself safe.

We might need a level of imagination to step away from the words in our head. To take ourselves to a place that isn’t necessarily real can be valuable and highlight what we need right now.